EXHIBITION
INSTALLATION
EVENT

I am not allowed to live in your reality

ฉันไม่ได้รับอนุญาติให้อยู่ในโลกของคุณ

Exhibition
2/18/2020
-
1/3/2020
BANGKOK
นิทรรศการ
2/18/2020
-
1/3/2020
กรุงเทพฯ

curator

Somrak Sila

ภัณฑารักษ์

สมรัก ศิลา

ARTISTS

Jirawut Ueasungkomsate

ศิลปิน

จิรวัฒน์ เอื้อสังคมเศรษฐ์

No items found.

I am not allowed to live in your reality

ฉันไม่ได้รับอนุญาติให้อยู่ในโลกของคุณ

I am not allowed to live in your reality

SPONSORS

สปอนเซอร์

No items found.

DESCRIPTION

‘I am not allowed to live in your reality’ is Jirawut’s second solo exhibition in Bangkok. The exhibition aims to raise questions about how art can be perceived and what influence restrictions from a highly nervous society and repressive power structure have on the dialogue between artist and the viewers.

The total number of refugees living in urban areas in Thailand is approximately 6,500. This may seem like a tiny fraction of the whole urban population. However, these 6,500 units of life are able to experience love, sadness, pain, and happiness like the un-refugees. Their tragic stories which have been hidden from public eyes because they face high risks of being arrested, are subsequences from an unclear legal status as well as an attitude of some enforcers. A society in which unawareness, ignorance could lead to detestation of otherness and create ambiguity that become prejudice against the empathy. Hence, it is essential to think and discuss, especially at this time when we could not avoid the social dynamic and the diversity arising from the movement of the world population, under the era's transition that has not yet provided the conclusion.

This became an inspiration for Jirawut to examine the concepts of existence and non-existence, of the visible and the invisible. What does it take to accept and acknowledge the existence of another human being – Does it depend on what the laws say? Or one’s beliefs towards race? Or our connections as human beings? I am not allowed to live in your reality may not provide all the answers but it invites you to experience another reality which exists in your world.

Jirawut Ueasungkomsate (b. 1986, Bangkok, Thailand) is a filmmaker and video artist with an MA degree in Experimental Film from Kingston University, United Kingdom. He obtained his BA in Archaeology and Anthropology from Silpakorn University in Thailand and also achieved BTEC HNC in Fine Art from Kensington and Chelsea College. His work has been exhibited in solo and several group shows in galleries in the UK, Japan and Thailand including ‘This is not a Political Act’, WTF Bar and Gallery, 2016, BKK, Thailand. SEA ArtsFest 2013, London, UK. ‘Resonance’, Asia Network Beyond Design, Tokyo Polytechnic University, Japan. Jirawut now is a lecturer at the Faculty of Information and Communication Technology, Silpakorn University, teaching mainly Documentary and Media Production.

The exhibition is made possible by Amnesty International Thailand and Justice for Peace Foundation, WTF Gallery, Faculty of Information and Communication Technology, Silpakorn University and Bangkok Art and Culture Centre.

STATEMENT/S

Everyone has their own unique world different than anyone else. People’s realities depend on causes as well as effects as perceived through their personal experiences. Subsequently, it is unavoidable that diversity or structural differences construct a ‘what is real’ concept in each person. But at the time, the cohabitation of humans developed to a certain point, we tended to find a median that could be used for constructing a lens that made us see things in a similar way. It created ideas of norm,
tradition, values before all flowering to be laws – so we have an apparatus to stigmatize,
condemn, encourage, punish, and praise.

In the modern world, laws are essential for determining the status of human roles in each society, as well as give a right to a person after assessing the person’s existence. But what will happen – if an identity of some people does not exist and be given under the law, we might be blinded and unable to see their humaneness as a consequence of any bias in social status, region, or origin.

‘I am not allowed to live in your reality’ is the reflection of a parallel universe where life is moving around in a circle and is never-ending. It was overlaid by a sound of chaos, uncertainty, and distrustfulness in humans amid changes in the world that have not yet revealed any conclusion for us to understand. Despite the fact that our perception might be different in color and form or we might live separately on the other side of social inequality, one thing that we cannot deny to is the fact that – our inner-self is a human all the same.

Jirawut Ueasungkomsate
January 2020

Curator Statement

Reality seems straightforward: you just look out and see the world. But anybody who engages with politics knows all too well how many of us see the world through the distorting lens of prejudice. Most of us see only what we want to see or, worse, what we are told to see. We see through the filter of our fear, insecurity or narcissism; fear for a threat to the system and authority; insecurity when placed outside our comfort zone; or simply selfishness and lack of empathy for those are different or less fortunate than us.

We are bombarded with news of local and global disasters, of shocking crimes, political scandals and climate calamity here and abroad, wars, refugee crises and so on. Media overload dulls our sensitivity to suffering, and our compassion is stretched to its limits? Have we gone terminally numb? Have we made a subconscious decision to look away, to not see -- as a form of self-preservation, because human suffering is so vast and horrifying? If so, what are we supposed to do about it?

‘I am not allowed to live in your reality’ is an interactive art installation, intending to not only raise awareness of issues that most Thais choose not to see, but also to combat compassion fatigue by looking at the unprecedented scale of the world refugee crises.

There are an estimated 70 million forcibly displaced people in the world right now – more than 20 million of whom have fled their countries to seek asylum all over the world, Thailand included. Nearly always they are the result of racism and nationalism, which are the very same issues the Thai political establishment is using and abusing to its own ends, polarising the country for political advantage.

By using virtual reality, the exhibition aims for the audience to remove their selves – their needs, their wishes -- so they can see the thing, not just as a mirror of their own interests or what others told them to see. Seeing well is not an inborn skill, like breathing. It requires training for humility, empathy and compassion.

Somrak Sila
January 2020

โลกของเรามีสีสันและขนาดองค์ประกอบภายในที่ไม่เท่ากัน เมื่อความจริงของมนุษย์ประสานสัมพันธ์ไปกับบริบทและผลกระทบจากการรับรู้ตามประสบการณ์ส่วนบุคคล ความหลากหลายหรือความแตกต่างในเชิงโครงสร้างที่ก่อกำเนิดให้เกิดโลกแห่งความเป็นจริงในแต่ละผู้คนจึงเป็นสิ่งที่มิอาจหลีกเลี่ยง แต่เมื่อการอยู่ร่วมกันของเหล่ามนุษย์พัฒนามาถึงจุดหนึ่ง การหาค่าเกณฑ์กลาง ที่จะบรรจุโครงสร้าง เพื่อประกอบแว่นที่ทำให้การมองเห็นของเราละม้ายคล้ายคลึงกัน นำมาซึ่งค่านิยาม จารีต ประเพณี ที่ออกดอกผลเป็นกฎหมาย ให้เราได้ใช้ตีตรา กล่าวโทษ ชื่นชม ลงทัณฑ์ และสรรเสริญ

กฎหมายในปัจจุบันมีความสำคัญต่อการกำหนดสถานะบทบาทมนุษย์ในสังคม รวมถึงยังทำหน้าที่มอบสิทธิหลังการประเมินว่าบุคคลผู้นั้นมีตัวตนแล้ว แต่จะทำอย่างไรหากสถานะตัวตนของคนบางกลุ่มไม่ได้มีอยู่และถูกกำหนดตามกฎหมาย การมองผ่านแว่นเพื่อให้เห็นความเป็นคนของเขาเหล่านั้นไม่สามารถทำได้ เพราะอคติทางชนชั้น ถิ่นหรือชาติกำเนิด

I am not allowed to live in your reality. คือภาพสะท้อนมิติคู่ขนานอีกแห่งหนึ่ง ที่ซึ่งชีวิตเคลื่อนไหวเป็นวงกลมอนันต์ มันถูกทำให้กลืนหายไปพร้อมกับเสียงของความวุ่นวาย ความไม่แน่นอน และความไม่ไว้วางใจในมนุษย์ที่มีต่อกันและกัน ในสภาพการณ์ความเปลี่ยนแปลงของโลก ที่ยังไม่เปิดเผยข้อสรุปให้เราได้ทำความเข้าใจ แต่ไม่ว่าการมองเห็นของเราจะแตกต่างกันทั้งในเชิงสีสันและรูปทรง สถานะทางสังคมของเราจะเหลื่อมล้ำสุดขอบฟ้า แต่สิ่งหนึ่งที่ไม่อาจปฏิเสธ ตัวตนฐานรากภายในของเราคือความเป็นมนุษย์เหมือนกัน

จิรวัฒน์ เอื้อสังคมเศรษฐ์
ศิลปิน
มกราคม 2563